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The original post

Posted by on 18.08.2007 at 17:35
The idea is simple... Talk about the languages you speak, and the ones you would like to learn. What are they? Why do you like them? What is that you don't like about them? How and where did you learn them? What is your mother language?

Personally...

- (As you *might* have noticed) I speak English. Not really well, but I think I can say I know the basis. But it is not my first language: French is. I don't want to sound pretentious or anything, but I speak French really well. Yet, it is the third language I learnt.
- My mother language is Arabic, it was the first one I learnt as I am Moroccan and was born in Morocco. But my parents speak French more than Arabic, and I started going to a French school when I was 5, thus, I started forgetting Arabic. I was still as able to understand it as before, but I couldn't speak it anymore, past my 8th birthday. (Some other important factors were involded, but it is not necessary to mention them.)
- The second language I learnt was Spanish, because of/thanks to Spanish TV channels and my grandmother, who only spoke Spanish and Arabic. But when we left the city where we were living (Tanger, just in front of Spain), I stopped watching Spanish channels, and left my grandmother as well, and then, forgot Spanish too .
- That's when French comes. It became my first language around 8. As the French school system wants it, I started learning English at 11. And I unexpectedly didn't have any difficulty with it. I have always had the best mark in that subject, without making any effort for that. Unfortunately it is still not enough. I realised my level was not as good as I thought it was.
- The next year, (I was 12) I chose Latin, but I had to stop after a few months, otherwise I wouldn't have been able to start Spanish the following year. I started re-learning Spanish at 13.
- But since I took Spanish at 13, I couldn't take German at 15. I had too many subjects and the teachers wouldn't let me add German. Yet it is the language I really want to learn. I like the sonority of it, and I watch German TV channels just to hear it, even if I don't get a word of it .
- As a consequence, the two languages I can speak the best are French, and English.

As you see the topic is vast, there is a lot to say...



Page 26 of 26

Karlabos
<insert title>

Posts: 1621

Age: 26
From: Brazil

  09.09.2014 at 20:39
Written by LordHypnos on 09.09.2014 at 20:02

Written by Karlabos on 09.09.2014 at 19:53


Actually 2000 are the most common ones. If you include family kanjis then this number raises to about 5000 and if you include hard words and technical term kanjis then even I don't know how much they raise up to =P

How many years did you spend learning it?

I took classes for about 2 years, but they were only in the saturdays. So i don't know that much... When I go back to Brazil i wanna go back to classes but on a more specialized and serious place, even though it will be more expensive :3
----
( ˘ﮦ ᴗ ˘ﮦ) ♪ '
LordHypnos

Posts: 351

Age: 21
From: Brazil

  09.09.2014 at 23:15
Written by Karlabos on 09.09.2014 at 20:39

Written by LordHypnos on 09.09.2014 at 20:02

Written by Karlabos on 09.09.2014 at 19:53


Actually 2000 are the most common ones. If you include family kanjis then this number raises to about 5000 and if you include hard words and technical term kanjis then even I don't know how much they raise up to =P

How many years did you spend learning it?

I took classes for about 2 years, but they were only in the saturdays. So i don't know that much... When I go back to Brazil i wanna go back to classes but on a more specialized and serious place, even though it will be more expensive :3

How much kanji were you able to memorize? Can I learn them all in, like, 4 years or so? 9 years is too much.
Karlabos
<insert title>

Posts: 1621

Age: 26
From: Brazil

  09.09.2014 at 23:23
Written by LordHypnos on 09.09.2014 at 23:15

How much kanji were you able to memorize? Can I learn them all in, like, 4 years or so? 9 years is too much.

Sheesh, Memorizing kanji is hard. It all depends on how much you study. If you just go to classes and expect to memorize them in 4 years i say you wont be able to

However you could enhance the process by going to sites like realkanji or so to practice. There is how i learned hiragana and katakana :3 Also it helped a lot with kanji, once i was the one in the class that was most ahead when it came to kanji. However i stopped practicing and started sucking....

So yeah, if yo want to be able to read/write kanji i guess you must stay practicing like... forever. They are too complex. its not just a common character like in english, greek or russian alphabet
----
( ˘ﮦ ᴗ ˘ﮦ) ♪ '
Ernis
狼獾

Posts: 6730

Age: 26
From: Estonia

  11.09.2014 at 20:48
Written by Karlabos on 09.09.2014 at 23:23

once i was the one in the class that was most ahead when it came to kanji. However i stopped practicing and started sucking....


The thing with the Chinese characters (kanji/hanzi) is that you need to be exposed to them on a daily basis. You need to use them i.e. read them and write them (yes, handwrite, not type the Latin input into your device and browse for the character)... otherwise your brain will just move them to the recycle bin and restoring them might not be as difficult as learning entirely new material but it will still be a chore...

I take notes in Chinese characters from time to time... they require less space and may be less time consuming to write (if they look like 上... something like 齉 is an entirely different thing... although why would one need to use that in a note anyway)... If I don't exactly remember the strokes, I just resort to splurging ink on the paper... sometimes a vague shape of a character can do the thing as well...

Example... instead of 得ing to 写 a 长名字 such as 石山er, 你就能写石山er。
Ok... instead of having to write a long name such as Steinberger, you can just write Steinberger (and you end up using characters only). The perks of accommodating a word into one character... if only you knew enough of them...
----
Go ahead, make my day...
Karlabos
<insert title>

Posts: 1621

Age: 26
From: Brazil

  11.09.2014 at 21:03
Written by Ernis on 11.09.2014 at 20:48

Written by Karlabos on 09.09.2014 at 23:23

once i was the one in the class that was most ahead when it came to kanji. However i stopped practicing and started sucking....


The thing with the Chinese characters (kanji/hanzi) is that you need to be exposed to them on a daily basis. You need to use them i.e. read them and write them (yes, handwrite, not type the Latin input into your device and browse for the character)... otherwise your brain will just move them to the recycle bin and restoring them might not be as difficult as learning entirely new material but it will still be a chore...

I take notes in Chinese characters from time to time... they require less space and may be less time consuming to write (if they look like 上... something like 齉 is an entirely different thing... although why would one need to use that in a note anyway)... If I don't exactly remember the strokes, I just resort to splurging ink on the paper... sometimes a vague shape of a character can do the thing as well...

Example... instead of 得ing to 写 a 长名字 such as 石山er, 你就能写石山er。
Ok... instead of having to write a long name such as Steinberger, you can just write Steinberger (and you end up using characters only). The perks of accommodating a word into one character... if only you knew enough of them...

Yeah I think those who are learning japanese are bound to know less kanji than those learning chinese. Probably because we use more hiragana and kataktana to express ourselves in the beggining, while in chinese you must know the kanjis. So i dont think i know many characters enough to start doing that. I could do the same with hiragana pretty easily though =P

Also Steinberg = 石山 I see what you did there xD The characters are the same for japanese here.
----
( ˘ﮦ ᴗ ˘ﮦ) ♪ '
Deadgirl

Posts: 575

Age: 25
From: USA

  25.09.2014 at 10:06
Written by Karlabos on 11.09.2014 at 21:03

Yeah I think those who are learning japanese are bound to know less kanji than those learning chinese. Probably because we use more hiragana and kataktana to express ourselves in the beggining, while in chinese you must know the kanjis. So i dont think i know many characters enough to start doing that. I could do the same with hiragana pretty easily though =P

Also Steinberg = 石山 I see what you did there xD The characters are the same for japanese here.

A friend of mine started out studying Japanese independently before going on to university to major in Japanese. He graduated last December and is now living in Japan, and he speaks, writes, and reads with native-like proficiency. Anyway, he was extremely successful in learning kanji. It's been a while since I talked to him about this, but if anyone cares to know I can ask him for more details on his exact method -- what I do remember him telling me was that before he started learning characters, he learned all the radicals. If I remember correctly, I think he also said something about memorizing the on and kun readings outside of the context of lexical items, which helped him develop a good intuition for pronouncing unfamiliar compound words (or, as good an intuition as one can have, I don't think they're always very predictable).
He also told me that he found his knowledge of Japanese kanji was extremely helpful when he took a course on classical Chinese literature, but not so much when he was studying modern Chinese. Apparently some of the characters they encountered a lot in the literature still had their original meanings in Japanese, while in Chinese the meanings had changed.


As for myself, I answered this thread a long-ass time ago, but my answer has changed slightly. Since I'm here, I might as well do it again, right?
Aside from English (which is my native language), I can also speak German, some Swedish, and some Japanese. Unfortunately, I'm so out of practice with Japanese that, while I can still talk to people about casual topics and things that I'm familiar with, I've lost so much kanji that I'm functionally illiterate. I can pick out words, but getting through even one paragraph is usually a nightmare.

In addition to that, I can read Middle High German (though, admittedly, it does take a bit of time). I can also sometimes read a little bit of Norwegian and Danish (again, it takes a while, and my level of success will depend on how complicated the text is, but success is possible). For kicks, I also like to go on Wikipedia and try to read articles in Dutch. Depending on the content of the article, I can sometimes comprehend a surprising amount of it. But most of the time it kind of just makes me feel like my brain is broken.

^--- Why all that stuff in the last paragraph? Because half of my bachelor's degree was in Germanic Languages and Literatures. The other half of my undergraduate studies was in Linguistics, which is why I also know more than I rightfully should know about Blackfoot, for someone who can't actually speak a word of it. Given the opportunity, I would dearly love to take an actual Blackfoot language course. There was supposed to be one offered at my current university this fall, but I wasn't able to take it because of a scheduling conflict, and I heard later on that it was cancelled anyway because the instructor resigned shortly before the semester started. I'm hoping they find someone else to teach it by next year so I can take it. Outside of that I'd like to learn any North American indigenous language, and I'm particularly interested in Algonquian languages (specifically Blackfoot and Shawnee, for reasons unrelated to each other).
----
Remember that you are mortal.
Nucky

Posts: 38
From: Slovenia

  08.10.2014 at 11:21
I speak slovene,english and serbian.. I know a little german from high school but to be honest my german is quite poor.. Also know a little spanish but not enough to talk to spanish speaking person.. I always loved scandinavian languages (Norwegian,Swedish and Finnish) and would like to learn them someday.. And I also love slavic languages.. (Russian)..

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