Distribution and Piracy. A Rant.

Written by: BitterCOld
Published: 30.11.2011
(edit! if you cannot read more than a whopping 300 words without changing the channel, skip to the end. that's the important part of the article. if you cannot make it to the crux and insist on commenting, i will mock you. unrepentantly. )

So by this point we are all pretty aware of how piracy and illegal downloading are killing the record industry. The labels won't shut up about it... but their points make sense. The less revenue a label is seeing for an investment the more it hinders the ability to sign other acts or even continue to work with current ones. You cannot fault a label for merely wanting to break even.

And while some of you might get your rocks off about "sticking it to the man" when you download something illegally, the reality is how many of these bands are on mean and nasty major labels like Sony? How many are on labels run out of an office the size of my garage?

I'd bet that most metal labels are run by metal fans who want to make enough money to put out more metal. If they were in it for the cash, they'd have ditched the distortion pedal in favor of auto-tune long ago.

And the "well, the band only gets $1 per cd" argument is bullshit too. The cut that goes to the label is to help cover the cost of recording and promoting the album. If a label puts $5,000 into recording and promoting an album (a completely arbitrary figure), but only gets $1,000 back, how likely are they to piss away another couple thousand dollars on a follow-up album? How likely are they to just cut ties altogether?

And if they lose money hand over fist on several acts, how likely are they to invest in new artists?



and to RAWR is metal.


So I am an ardent supporter of, erm, supporting both artists that make good music as well as labels that sign/put out the albums of artists that make good music.

However what chaps my hide is the whining about piracy in the current technological and ethical environment and yet sticking to antiquated distribution systems.

In this day and age, I find it a reasonable request to have timely access to a new release that has already dropped across the pond. I do not see why there is all too often a 30 day discrepancy.

Enslaved's latest, Axioma Ethica Odini dropped the 27th of September in Europe and a day later in the US. Hooray. Timely access! It can be done!

Yet all too often the gaps between release dates are absurd. You can laugh at my (clearly illustrated) plight in the thread for Candlemass' Death Magic Doom. The album drops April 3rd of 2009, Lucas gets his review published April 15th, and I post how I cannot wait for it's eventual US release... and two weeks later quote myself again, still waiting and wondering. Thanks to Ivan's handy dandy album purchase tracker, you can see I didn't get it until May 6th. And I made weekly pilgrimages to the local shop, hoping for it. A full month and change later.

There have been several other cases through time, and even now with the latest Oranssi Pazuzu. Mr. Doctor has had it since the 26th of October. (Fuck you and your afro too, Roddy!) I checked again today, a month and change later, and not only is it not yet available in the States, it won't be for another three weeks. Hell, it'd be quicker if I sent Marcel $25, had him buy it in the Netherlands, hire a glass blower to encase it in a wine bottle, launch it into the Atlantic, have Dismal Euphony wait for it to wash up in Boston Harbor, and then hire a couple homing pigeons carry it in a net and fly it the remaining 3,000 miles to my house.

The gap is so massive, even an ardent supporter of paying for music like me is about to crack and give in. And if I'm going to break, it likely means the folks who sit on the "Download or Buy?" fence did a while ago. You'll never see a dime out of them. And if the price is $27, as Amazon currently lists it, you might not get mine as well...

I can understand with smaller labels and bands (the Pazuz) that there might be difficulties in being high on the priority list for overseas distributors (there shouldn't for that latest Candlemass)... leading to delays, but don't just sit there flat footed.

Do something to make your fucking music available in the interim. Put it up on iTunes. Put it up on Spotify. Make it available for (PAID) download straight from both the band and label sites.

Put yourself in a position to where you don't fuel the easy out for the "I deserve a trophy for showing up" generation. Because to the youth of today (your largest target demographic), the choice between illegally downloading a copy or waiting a month to fork over cash to hear it is not a terribly difficult one. Particularly when the culture has already painted you "greedy" record execs (currently struggling to get by) as Fat Cats who are morally acceptable targets.


 



Written on 30.11.2011 by
BitterCOld
BitterCOld has been officially reviewing albums for MetalStorm since 2009.
More articles by BitterCOld ››




Comments page 3 of 3

‹‹ Back to the Articles Pages: 1 2 [3]
Comments: 137  
Users visited: 334  
Search this topic:  


Kingface - 04.12.2011 at 03:41  
Interesting article and comments from others, as is often the case in this topic of discussion. Earlier on, I read a very interesting Power Quest interview where the topic how the band is financed, how it's effected by the current Music climate etc is talked about and makes for very interesting reading. It is well worth a read if you have any interest in Music, regardless of whether you like the Band or not.

http://www.themayfairmallzine.com/ - The article is at this link and if you scroll down the Home Page, you will get to a selection of the latest interviews, which includes the Power Quest one I refer to.
AngelCorpse13 - 04.12.2011 at 22:12  
Very interesting thought, I have recently seen Exhumed on their US tour and throughout the show them and Blood Red Throne both specifically commented on the topic. What makes this worth saying something about is that both bands merely encouraged the fans to listen to them, didn't give any fucks about whether we bought the album or not even went as far as saying "If you stole on the internet, bought it or whatever thanks for listening...we only see about 10 bucks of it anyway".

But I for one try to stay honorable, however after the Decapitated and Morbid Angel releases I've gone to downloading to listen before I buy. So if it sucks, it gets burned with no one hurt or out of money and I don't have a personal hatred towards the band for my loss of 20 dollars and an hour long headache and obviously if it's the shit, it earns my hard earned cash and becomes part of the collection. I for one have always thought that was fair, no way to judge an album based on 4 - 30 second long samples and with each album in this genre going anywhere from 13-40 bucks an album, I as a consumer want to know if it's something I want to keep or if it's not going to be something I want, therefore...listening session.
psykometal - 05.12.2011 at 00:47  
Well Bitter I have read your 850 words and I have read everybody else's words too and my commentary is going to be more about the piracy simply because your rant basically said what needed to be said and Jup expanded on it so I personally do not feel that I need to say more. Therefore...I (same as others) feel more compelled to defend my "evil pirating ways" so I'm going to have to back the same excuse as Troy and the "3rd worlders" (sounds like a poor African jazz band or something, lol) as I too am a broke mofo so I pirate bcuz I can't afford to buy cd's and merch atm. I used to be able to, and I did buy all the collector stuff and lots of merch (I could go a month and half without washing shirts because of how many band shirts I have from all the shows I used to go to weekly/monthly) and went to lots of shows but I have found myself in a low point in life and can't afford to buy albums right now and won't be able to for a while, so I refuse to go a couple years without increasing my collection of music therefore I pirate in the interum. When I get my finances back on track and I have expendable income again it will most definitely be my pleasure to continue to buy cds, go to shows and buy merch to support my fave bands.
Mattybu - 05.12.2011 at 03:08  
I have never pirated music. I buy all my CDs, despite nonsensically bad selection at local "record stores" (HMV). If something isn't there I'll go on amazon or other websites and use prepaid VISA cards to buy it (I am not old enough for a real credit card). I used to have a part time job so that was one way to get money for CDs and vinyls. I understand the point of view of people without the finances to buy albums but since I have the money to spend I would rather support the artists than not.
Troy Killjoy - 05.12.2011 at 03:26  
Written by Mattybu on 05.12.2011 at 03:08
I would rather support the artists than not.

Definitely. I swear when I worked at the grocery store I spent more money on CDs than food.

Something I plan on getting back into come February when I start working again.
Ivor - 05.12.2011 at 11:33  
Now Switzerland seems to be a forward-thinking country as the government decided piracy ain't illegal.
Quote:
The government's argument was this: intervening through additional copyright legislation would make sense if it preserved the economic benefit of content like music and movies. But intervening would bring with it its own economic costs. The government then looked at 22 studies analyzing the effects of piracy on the music industry, with five showing a positive impact on sales and three showing no correlation. In Switzerland and the Netherlands, sales of movie tickets remained constant between 1999 and 2007. Since it could show that Swiss citizens had continued to spend money in the entertainment sector, the government felt that it could not impose additional regulations.


Furthermore:
Quote:
Large foreign production companies are likely to be most affected, the government said. "You have to adapt to the changing consumer behavior,"


Which is basically Craig's message to labels and distributors - go with the change.

I.
Deleted Scenes - 05.12.2011 at 19:27  
Any good business adapts its methods to meet the needs and wants of its target market, as they change over time. If they don't, they die. And if they die, the business in question can only blame itself for it's downfall, for failing to provide what the consumer wants. The consumer is not to blame.

This is where the record industry is going wrong. Their ancient business model doesn't work in the information age. They know this themselves, yet instead of adapting to an alternative model that would work, the industry seems content to sit back and carry on as it always has, and threaten us with huge fines and/or prison for pirating their products.

And that only makes things worse. The threats and lack of a willingness to adapt just make the consumer (their own potential customer) angry. "Why the fuck should I hand over my hard earned cash to those greedy, selfish bastards?!" Whether right or wrong, a growing number of people do think like that, and it's easy to understand why.

If the record industry is going under as profits are falling - and it's debatable whether piracy does harm profits (the Swiss have a perfectly valid point) - it's up to them to change their ways, not us as consumers.

Personally, I'm quite happy to see labels die if they refuse to change their ways. I'm also quite happy to see bands go under that support their label's ancient model. Music will always get made. The bands and labels that die, will eventually be replaced by other, more forward thinking ones. Life will go on.

I myself do buy CDs/vinyl where I think the product is worth my money (and money is available), and I go to shows and buy merch too. I also download music. The music I download, I don't pay for. I probably never will. If I'm buying an album, I want the complete package (artwork, lyrics and liner notes, a hard copy of the music etc), not just a few megabytes of data on my hard drive. Also, the amount I download has absolutely no negative effect on the amount I spend purchasing physical copies of albums. If anything it's a positive effect, because by downloading, I discover far more albums that I want to buy - albums that I wouldn't have ever heard otherwise.

A physical product I can hold in my hands, I will happily pay for. The data that comes along my telephone line, is (or should be) covered by my internet subscription fee. You get x amount of gigabytes per month download limit, for y amount of cash. Simple. Why should we have to pay twice for the same thing? Because that's essentially what happens everytime you buy a song/album from iTunes.

Pretty much everything you see on the internet is copyrighted by someone, yet you can download an image or the content of a webpage, for your own personal use, without the threat of prosecution. You can record a TV show, for your own personal use, without the threat of prosecution.

Why should music be any different? If I freely download a song, and the band/label aren't getting paid any royalties, then surely it's up to them to get together with ISPs, and work out a system where they do get paid. Maybe the end to 'unlimited' download contracts is the answer?

How about something like this:
- Bands/labels make all their releases available for download, completely free, on official websites.
- Cram those official websites full of adverts. They would undoubtedly be high traffic sites, so theres plenty of £££ to be made from this. That's your royalties sorted.
- The consumer pays the ISP based on the amount of data they download, instead of being 'unlimited' (maybe £x.xx per month for yGB of downloads, then an extra few pence per MB over the set limit.
- The ISP monitors exactly what songs are downloaded (which they could fairly easily do), and pass on the relevant amount of money to the relevant copyright holders. That's a bit more paid in royalties, in case the adverts don't satisfy the greed of the labels.
- Maybe even log the details of who is downloading what, and sell the information on to various companies to use for targeted advertising... i.e. in the same way Facebook make their millions. There's yet another few quid for the labels.

I'm not the first to suggest that. Not by a long, long way. The record industry know themselves that it's a realistic possibility. I believe Radiohead and a number of other well known artists support a similar distribution model themselves. Yet the industry still refuses to embrace change, instead preferring extra security/protection and threats of legal action.

Well if that continues to be their attitude, they can go fuck themselves. Music will survive a hell of a lot longer than them, and I'll be laughing when the inevitable happens, and the big names start going under. They only have themselves to blame. Good riddance.

EDIT: Reading this through, I'm aware it's not particularly well written. Sorry if it's a difficult read. The points are still valid ones though, in my opinion.
Ivor - 05.12.2011 at 22:42  
While I like what you wrote I want to comment on something in particular.

Written by Deleted Scenes on 05.12.2011 at 19:27

- The consumer pays the ISP based on the amount of data they download, instead of being 'unlimited' (maybe £x.xx per month for yGB of downloads, then an extra few pence per MB over the set limit.
- The ISP monitors exactly what songs are downloaded (which they could fairly easily do), and pass on the relevant amount of money to the relevant copyright holders. That's a bit more paid in royalties, in case the adverts don't satisfy the greed of the labels.

Dude, I take it you are not in the IT field yourself and have absolutely no clue what developing this kind of infrastructure would cost. If you've been keeping track of your own country's propositions along those lines, ie track what people download and ban them from the internet on multiple offenses, you'd know why this will fail. The development and setup of such infrastructure costs far more than labels, etc., lose to piracy. Not just a bit more, the difference is estimated to be in magnitudes if my memory serves me right. So, setting up a similar monitoring solution would not be profitable. Besides, there's absolutely no way you'd be able to get every ISP to invest in such a thing. However, I do like to think that simply charging a flat royalty fee from ISPs (and thus through them from the consumer) and making everything free on the Internet is a far more viable solution. But then you get a bunch of people saying "Bohoo, it's not fair, I don't even listen to music/watch films/etc." Personally, I'd say screw them. If you don't listen to music and are charged, maybe you should then?

Anyway, tl;dr version. Won't work, costs shitloads of money to setup, more than there is to gain probably. I'd vote for flat royalty fee and thus a bit more expensive Internet subscription, though.

I.
Deleted Scenes - 05.12.2011 at 23:19  
Written by Ivor on 05.12.2011 at 22:42
If you've been keeping track of your own country's propositions along those lines, ie track what people download and ban them from the internet on multiple offenses, you'd know why this will fail. The development and setup of such infrastructure costs far more than labels, etc., lose to piracy. Not just a bit more, the difference is estimated to be in magnitudes if my memory serves me right. So, setting up a similar monitoring solution would not be profitable. Besides, there's absolutely no way you'd be able to get every ISP to invest in such a thing. However, I do like to think that simply charging a flat royalty fee from ISPs (and thus through them from the consumer) and making everything free on the Internet is a far more viable solution. But then you get a bunch of people saying "Bohoo, it's not fair, I don't even listen to music/watch films/etc." Personally, I'd say screw them. If you don't listen to music and are charged, maybe you should then?

Anyway, tl;dr version. Won't work, costs shitloads of money to setup, more than there is to gain probably. I'd vote for flat royalty fee and thus a bit more expensive Internet subscription, though.

I.

Yeah, I appreciate there's a lot of cost involved there. Like you said yourself though, it can be simplified to a much cheaper method... and if internet subscriptions in general are on a 'pay for what you use' basis, then people who don't download music/films etc don't lose out anyway, because they obviously use a lot less than someone downloading say 10 albums and a couple of movies each week. Their subscriptions would, on the whole, be cheaper than they are currently.

Anyway, my main point was really all about advertising. Sites like Facebook make silly amounts of money either from cramming their pages full of adverts, or logging and selling users' details to companies for targeted marketing purposes (simply logging in to Facebook gives them access to your entire internet history, so there's a massive amount of data for them to sell on). Major record companies could easily follow that kind of methodology on their own and make millions from it, and smaller labels could do it through an HMV style 'middle-man' that takes a cut and passes on the rest. The product is made available to a huge number of people, free of charge to the consumer, and labels still get paid... Everyone's a winner.

Which is the best method to use though, isn't important. What is important, is that there are a number of alternative distribution methods available (many of them easily implemented and relatively low cost), but the industry refuses to embrace any of them. They don't seem to care about their customers, so until they do make the change, why should any of us care whether or not the industry goes bankrupt? I certainly don't.
Mattybu - 06.12.2011 at 00:28  
Written by Troy Killjoy on 05.12.2011 at 03:26

Written by Mattybu on 05.12.2011 at 03:08
I would rather support the artists than not.

Definitely. I swear when I worked at the grocery store I spent more money on CDs than food.

Something I plan on getting back into come February when I start working again.


If you don't mind me asking, what kind of grocery store did you work at? Depending on the answer you'll probably be deemed somewhere in between semi-badass and Governator.

My job was pretty shitty, but it was a pretty good way of getting money for doing relatively little. And I got to enjoy some full-time CD buying mode which is always fun.
Troy Killjoy - 06.12.2011 at 00:40  
Written by Mattybu on 06.12.2011 at 00:28
If you don't mind me asking, what kind of grocery store did you work at?

Giant Tiger. Not a grocery store (more like a family thrift store), but I was the head of the fresh/frozen grocery department and was responsible for ordering all perishable product.
Mattybu - 06.12.2011 at 00:44  
Written by Troy Killjoy on 06.12.2011 at 00:40

Written by Mattybu on 06.12.2011 at 00:28
If you don't mind me asking, what kind of grocery store did you work at?

Giant Tiger. Not a grocery store (more like a family thrift store), but I was the head of the fresh/frozen grocery department and was responsible for ordering all perishable product.


7/10 badass. I went into Giant Tiger the other day and found a thing of 50 warheads for like 2.49 or something. The thing about Giant Tiger is that you'll find gems sometimes but be a little disappointed other times.

My turn: I worked at the snack bar at my local hockey arena, serving people hot chocolates and candy and such. Lot of standing around. I invented a game called "Fry Whips" to play in the back room. I would basically take fries, put them on the scooper thing, and whip them around and get really excited whenever one got in the garbage can... Good times.
Troy Killjoy - 06.12.2011 at 00:49  
Written by Mattybu on 06.12.2011 at 00:44
My turn: I worked at the snack bar at my local hockey arena, serving people hot chocolates and candy and such. Lot of standing around. I invented a game called "Fry Whips" to play in the back room. I would basically take fries, put them on the scooper thing, and whip them around and get really excited whenever one got in the garbage can... Good times.

Ya I'll be the first to say you worked a lot less than I did for presumably around the same wage. I feel duped. Busting my ass for 50 hours a week just to blow it all on music that realistically isn't even that important considering it's all out there for free.
Ivor - 06.12.2011 at 00:52  
Written by Deleted Scenes on 05.12.2011 at 23:19

Which is the best method to use though, isn't important. What is important, is that there are a number of alternative distribution methods available (many of them easily implemented and relatively low cost), but the industry refuses to embrace any of them. They don't seem to care about their customers, so until they do make the change, why should any of us care whether or not the industry goes bankrupt? I certainly don't.

Advertising's a different matter and possibly a good alternative solution to some extent. But as far as industry goes, for some reason I'm having a feeling that they will not embrace the change in full until the turnover of generations occurs, meaning that until download generation gets behind the wheel the old way of making business in music will take a long time to change or die out.

I.
Mattybu - 06.12.2011 at 00:55  
Written by Troy Killjoy on 06.12.2011 at 00:49

Written by Mattybu on 06.12.2011 at 00:44
My turn: I worked at the snack bar at my local hockey arena, serving people hot chocolates and candy and such. Lot of standing around. I invented a game called "Fry Whips" to play in the back room. I would basically take fries, put them on the scooper thing, and whip them around and get really excited whenever one got in the garbage can... Good times.

Ya I'll be the first to say you worked a lot less than I did for presumably around the same wage. I feel duped. Busting my ass for 50 hours a week just to blow it all on music that realistically isn't even that important considering it's all out there for free.


lol probably man. Some nights it got crazy and I had to actually get mass amounts of hockey moms and their whining kids snacks and food, but a lot of the time if someone else was working with me I would just go to the back (out of view from possible boss sightings) and play Pokemon or Block Breaker. Or studied for school, etc. To be honest I probably would've had more respect for the job in general if my supervisor didn't act like such a douche all the time (eg telling me to get my hands out of my pockets when there's nobody even around to see).

Regarding the music buying aspect of it, I think it's worth it to buy albums. Especially metal albums, which a lot get overlooked by 99.999% of the public anyways.
HassoT - 06.12.2011 at 12:50  
Written by BitterCOld on 01.12.2011 at 17:52

They do. Century Media wanted their albums off... boom... they are off Spotify.


I said, it's a simplified. Somewhat less simplified view is "some of labels are in the position to make such moves, many of them are not".

Written by BitterCOld on 01.12.2011 at 17:52

As fr it being legal to kill your wife in some jurisdictions (SMiLEY FACE!), i am not sure what this has to do with the issue at hand... aside from pointing out that some jurisdictions clearly need to address their stance on capital crimes.


It was just (yes, over the top) an example that being legal isn't necessary ethical.

Written by BitterCOld on 01.12.2011 at 17:52

I also presented other options (download on iTunes, paid download from label/band site) which ensure both band and label get cash.


No objections. Except that most of world can't (at least legally use iTunes, Amazon or most of other major electronic distribution channels. They can't use Spotify and other similar services either, btw .

Written by BitterCOld on 01.12.2011 at 17:52

not sure why you harp in a singular suggestion... unless Spotify married your sister, happened to live in one of those jurisdictions you refer to, and tossed her down an elevator shaft.


I just don't Spotify marketed as saviour of music. It isn't.
vezzy - 06.12.2011 at 15:55  
Written by HassoT on 06.12.2011 at 12:50
No objections. Except that most of world can't (at least legally use iTunes, Amazon or most of other major electronic distribution channels. They can't use Spotify and other similar services either, btw .


You mean someone cracked iTunes and Amazon so I can buy everything for free?

Holy shit, where do I get those?
BreadGod - 06.12.2011 at 23:11  
Since we're on the subject of piracy, what is your opinion of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) that is currently in congress?
Troy Killjoy - 06.12.2011 at 23:13  
Featured above: this thread's best question.
BitterCOld - 06.12.2011 at 23:20  
I am not thrilled with piracy, acknowledge it exists and would encourage alternate behavior - at least in regards to metal music. you wanna download the latest hollywood flick? fine by me... they've changed their own distribution game to where they don't get punished for making terrible movie after terrible movie.

i am not in favor of censorship.
ErnilEnNaur - 07.12.2011 at 12:42  
The sad truth is that most artists in pretty much all genres have almost completely lost touch with reality, they don't understand how little money their target demographic has and they over prize their albums like crazy. At least that's how it is here in Estonia. The record companies are only sort of greedy, they see what's going on and they sort of understand that an average person cannot afford to pay much for an album, music stores most certainly know this too, but the artists themselves don't seem to understand. That doesn't justify piracy in any way, but it helps explain it.
vezzy - 07.12.2011 at 18:53  
If it's an industry, it must die. That is all.
Mikyz - 08.12.2011 at 11:40  
I don't exactly have a choice, since practically no metal albums are available/permitted in Lebanon. When I am out of the country I do buy some albums but I don't want to spend all my money on metal albums either. I think artists earn most of their money in concerts and events, that goes for all music genres Bieberific and Kvlt, and I believe labels know that as well so I don't think they expect any kind of profit, coming from album purchases.
Thrash del Sur - 09.12.2011 at 17:47  
Written by Mikyz on 08.12.2011 at 11:40

I don't exactly have a choice, since practically no metal albums are available/permitted in Lebanon. When I am out of the country I do buy some albums but I don't want to spend all my money on metal albums either. I think artists earn most of their money in concerts and events, that goes for all music genres Bieberific and Kvlt, and I believe labels know that as well so I don't think they expect any kind of profit, coming from album purchases.


Totally agree with you, the fact is the internet gave to Metal a new breath. I think with the advance of techonology is easier to record an album a good quality album, so the bands have 2 options either finannce their own reocrds or convince the concerts promoters (who are the direct beneficiaries of all this) to sponsor their records. I know it sounds crazy but the death of record companies is inevitable and I happy for that
Thrash del Sur - 02.01.2012 at 15:02  
Quote:
I think the advance of technology is what's killing today's metal music. Most albums are overproduced and brickwalled as fuck, which takes away their mystic sound and atmosphere.


Ok I get you, most ppl do shit, but there're some musicians who can produce a good album without obnoxious arrangements and 25 guitars, making a good album.
whatsacow - 12.01.2012 at 18:34  
Come live in Australia. It took 3 weeks to get Opeth's Heritage. Fucking opeth! It's not like theyre unheard of. In fact, anything less famous than Opeth in the metal department I've had to buy off Amazon. I'm not talking small names here. I've had to get Devin Townsend, Burzum, Morbid Angel and even Mr Bungle (cmon, you'd think someone at a record store would know who Mr Bungle is!) albums off Amazon, simply because our shops here wont stock anything that isnt multi-platinum. And then I have to wait another 4 weeks for shipping.
BitterCOld - 12.01.2012 at 18:57  
Written by whatsacow on 12.01.2012 at 18:34

Come live in Australia. It took 3 weeks to get Opeth's Heritage. Fucking opeth! It's not like theyre unheard of. In fact, anything less famous than Opeth in the metal department I've had to buy off Amazon. I'm not talking small names here. I've had to get Devin Townsend, Burzum, Morbid Angel and even Mr Bungle (cmon, you'd think someone at a record store would know who Mr Bungle is!) albums off Amazon, simply because our shops here wont stock anything that isnt multi-platinum. And then I have to wait another 4 weeks for shipping.


which is exactly why i am ridiculing the industry. it whines about piracy cutting in to their income (not profit, mind you. a good chunk are losing money) - but not doing anything to expedite delivery to a person like you. thanks to the advances in technology, everyone wants their shit and wants it now. and in a lot of cases have immediate access.

is that three weeks after the AUssie release date? or just the Euro one? (i.e. Candlemass coming out a month later in the US than Europe.)

maybe offer a code for a free download of an album you've just purchased so you have immediate access to your purchase while waiting for it to be delivered. (i know many vinyls come with such a code... Marcel has actually bounced one my way.) the label is happy knowing it made a sale and they reward the purchaser with immediate gratification to tide them over during the delivery period.
Marcel Hubregtse - 12.01.2012 at 19:33  
Written by BitterCOld on 12.01.2012 at 18:57

(i know many vinyls come with such a code... Marcel has actually bounced one my way.) the label is happy knowing it made a sale and they reward the purchaser with immediate gratification to tide them over during the delivery period.


Relapse gives you a download code with all their vinyl releases, as do some more labels.
BitterCOld - 12.01.2012 at 19:34  
Written by Marcel Hubregtse on 12.01.2012 at 19:33

Written by BitterCOld on 12.01.2012 at 18:57

(i know many vinyls come with such a code... Marcel has actually bounced one my way.) the label is happy knowing it made a sale and they reward the purchaser with immediate gratification to tide them over during the delivery period.


Relapse gives you a download code with all their vinyl releases, as do some more labels.


they should do so with mail orders of at least THEIR releases as well, provided they aren't pre-orders. particularly if it takes weeks to reach the destination.
Marcel Hubregtse - 12.01.2012 at 19:36  
Written by BitterCOld on 12.01.2012 at 19:34

they should do so with mail orders of at least THEIR releases as well, provided they aren't pre-orders. particularly if it takes weeks to reach the destination.


Agreed. So you order something on-line and in the confirmation e-mail with the albums listed you their respective download codes.
whatsacow - 13.01.2012 at 05:27  
Written by BitterCOld on 12.01.2012 at 18:57

Written by whatsacow on 12.01.2012 at 18:34

Come live in Australia. It took 3 weeks to get Opeth's Heritage. Fucking opeth! It's not like theyre unheard of. In fact, anything less famous than Opeth in the metal department I've had to buy off Amazon. I'm not talking small names here. I've had to get Devin Townsend, Burzum, Morbid Angel and even Mr Bungle (cmon, you'd think someone at a record store would know who Mr Bungle is!) albums off Amazon, simply because our shops here wont stock anything that isnt multi-platinum. And then I have to wait another 4 weeks for shipping.


which is exactly why i am ridiculing the industry. it whines about piracy cutting in to their income (not profit, mind you. a good chunk are losing money) - but not doing anything to expedite delivery to a person like you. thanks to the advances in technology, everyone wants their shit and wants it now. and in a lot of cases have immediate access.

is that three weeks after the AUssie release date? or just the Euro one? (i.e. Candlemass coming out a month later in the US than Europe.)

maybe offer a code for a free download of an album you've just purchased so you have immediate access to your purchase while waiting for it to be delivered. (i know many vinyls come with such a code... Marcel has actually bounced one my way.) the label is happy knowing it made a sale and they reward the purchaser with immediate gratification to tide them over during the delivery period.

That was weeks after the US release. But yeah, I got a download code with Maudlin of the Well's Bath (not a new release, but not available in Australia anyway)
Grody2themax - 23.01.2012 at 21:46  
Written by BitterCOld on 12.01.2012 at 18:57

maybe offer a code for a free download of an album you've just purchased so you have immediate access to your purchase while waiting for it to be delivered. (i know many vinyls come with such a code... Marcel has actually bounced one my way.) the label is happy knowing it made a sale and they reward the purchaser with immediate gratification to tide them over during the delivery period.


That would be a good idea. Sometimes when i buy an album I'd rather just mediafire it than spend the time ripping it onto my computer anyways. But I'll usually rip it since the quality is better. But labels should consider the amount of time it takes to pirate an album vs. the time it takes to buy one, which could involve shipping time, driving, ripping the cd...etc. Overall, it doesn't matter if you live in a record shop with a given album. It would be easier and quicker to illegally odwnload the album than it would be to find it. Don't mean to ramble on here, but my main point is that it can be such a hassle to buy albums and get them onto your computer, and labels could work on ways to make this more accessible and easier in comparison to pirating.
Cynic Metalhead - 28.01.2012 at 15:26  


I think I am trapped. :[
Cill O' Connor - 02.02.2012 at 21:14  
I download music, and I do feel guilty about it but I just don't have the money to buy all that music. I try and make up for it by (when I do have money) going to see the band's show and buying one of their t shirts. Which actually gives them more money than if I'd bought their CD; though I know that's not exactly the principle of it. When I get a job and have a steady cash flow that allows me to indulge in the expensive hobby of CD collecting I will certainly begin buying a lot more metal. Because the bands do deserve it. Especially the ones on smaller labels struggling to get by.
pisymbol - 02.05.2012 at 19:06  
Written by Grody2themax on 23.01.2012 at 21:46

Written by BitterCOld on 12.01.2012 at 18:57

maybe offer a code for a free download of an album you've just purchased so you have immediate access to your purchase while waiting for it to be delivered. (i know many vinyls come with such a code... Marcel has actually bounced one my way.) the label is happy knowing it made a sale and they reward the purchaser with immediate gratification to tide them over during the delivery period.


That would be a good idea. Sometimes when i buy an album I'd rather just mediafire it than spend the time ripping it onto my computer anyways. But I'll usually rip it since the quality is better. But labels should consider the amount of time it takes to pirate an album vs. the time it takes to buy one, which could involve shipping time, driving, ripping the cd...etc. Overall, it doesn't matter if you live in a record shop with a given album. It would be easier and quicker to illegally odwnload the album than it would be to find it. Don't mean to ramble on here, but my main point is that it can be such a hassle to buy albums and get them onto your computer, and labels could work on ways to make this more accessible and easier in comparison to pirating.


Its called Bandcamp.

Thanks to Troy, I found this thread.

What I don't understand is that if we as consumers all understand (demand!) that the distribution model for a lot of record companies is completely broken, why can't they adapt?

Why is it so difficult to offer all the services mention in this thread? (except the ISP one which is absolutely insane on both technical and ethical levels)

Dear <Insert record company>:

As a consumer of music I would like the following options:

* Immediate digital download of the music in my choice of format (FLAC, MP3, ALAC, etc.) when I buy the hard copy
* Please stream new releases on your website so it can act as an advertising landing pad for merch/ticket offers (or other label artists that I might want to investigate)
* Stop getting angry when I download a recommendation off the web that I got from a friend (as many have pointed out, it encourages me to listen to more music which means ultimately more dollars eventually spent with record companies)
* Embrace established technologies (e.g. Spotify, Bandcamp, Facebook) unless you are willing to spend the labor to create new and more innovative distribution methods
* Folks who take advantage of the system are not going to buy much legally anyway - THEY ARE NOT YOUR TARGET DEMOGRAPHIC. Please focus on consumers like myself, the working class metal head who has extra personal income to spend on music (and will most happily do so if given the above options).

Sincerely,

Your Consumers
tea[m]ster - 12.05.2012 at 19:30  
Awesome read Craig, but I am afraid the major reason to hack or not to hack has nothing to do with a release date. The main reason is the easy accessability. No more trips to the record store (if you can find one), no more planning ahead. Who wants the cd case anymore now anyways? iTunes and Napster are garbage and most peeps don't want to take the time to find a reputable digital online distributer. The way the album quality transfers are now (lossless, flac, ape) it's just easier to check out a blog and see what the latest releases are and click. What do I care if the new Cult Of Luna is released later here than Europe. I will find something else to listen to.

Bandcamp is the way to go. I can sample the music, decide if I like it, and more times than not, name a price I feel is worthy (usually $10). Most offer a digital download or digipak if lyrics and cases are your thing. I will always support a product I like. Of course this goes for most of the bands not on a huge label where production costs can be in the millions. A band like Rosetta does not make anything from their releases. They don't care how you get their music. They rely on selling merchandise and records at their shows.

Funny, my whole response can go for the gaming industry too, with a few minor tweaks.
Cuca Beludo - 05.07.2012 at 22:06  
I download music... a lot. I know it's not the right thing, but I SIMPLY DON'T HAVE THE MONEY TO BUY ALBUMS. When I get a job I will go and buy these albums I'm downloading. I don't need to pay my bills and I will have enough money to do whatever I want

Written by Cynic Metalhead on 28.01.2012 at 15:26



I think I am trapped. :[


We will be locked in the same room, mr. Atrocious

Advertise on Metal Storm
Pages: 1 2 [3]


Login or register to post here.



Similar topics

Forum Topic Similarity Started
Articles Between the Baroness and Mastodon. In Tucson. Let's Get It On! 4.5 13.05.2010 by afu
Reviews Helllight - ...And Then, The Light Of Consciousness Became Hell... 3.5 04.04.2011 by Mr. Doctor
Reviews Grieving Age - Merely The Fleshless We And The Awed Obsequy 3.5 06.12.2013 by Northern Danger
Reviews Whales And Aurora - The Shipwreck 3.5 26.10.2012 by Susan
Reviews Darkthrone - Dark Thrones And Black Flags 3.5 31.10.2008 by Turin Turambar



Hits total: 5481 | This month: 84