A Newbie's Thoughts On Metal Genres

Written by: Xim
Published: 30.04.2010
Although, I've only been really listening to rock and metal music for a few years, I have been deeply interested in the power and sacredness that is heavy metal. Heavy metal is perhaps the most purest and authentic form of music ever. Metal is not something filled with noise, shouting and smashing and blaring of instruments, it is a strong form of music filled with skill, passion, power, and being just hella-fuckin'-balls-to-the-wall-bad-ass.

Anyways, the point of this note is for me to both test my own knowledge, and yours, as well as teach those willing to learn, or just like reading things. This is not a fully accurate guide, I'll admit, as I'm really a newbie to the scene.

Early Metal
In the beginning metal drew influences from hard rock, psychedelic rock and blues rock. The basics were set with heavily distorted detuned guitars, a heavy bass sound that was both loud yet it didn't drown out the lead guitars and heavy drumming with extended drum kits. Vocals were typically high-pitched.
Examples: Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Blue Öyster Cult, Thin Lizzy, Rainbow, Rush, Scorpions

Heavy Metal
Although, you could call early metal bands "heavy metal" as well, later bands really put the "heavy" into heavy metal. They drew away from the blues influences and added more aggression and energy into the music, inspired by punk rock. Many of these bands were from Britain, forming the New Wave of British Heavy metal. Although some bands of this style were either before the scene started, or not from Britain.
Examples: Judas Priest, Iron Madien, Motorhead, Manowar, Mercyful Fate, Diamond Head, Girlschool, Saxon, Black Label Society, Aria, Black Tide



Speed Metal
Speed metal set the basis for the well-known thrash and power metal genres. Speed metal bands, obviously put an emphasis on speed with their styles of heavy metal. Typically speed metal was influenced by old-skool punk bands (since at the time old-skool punk was the only kind of punk). So this is when we got more double kick pedals on the bass drums, and fast playing of the guitars.
Examples: Motörhead, Accept, Judas Priest, Running Wild, Helloween, Venom, Amebix

Glam Metal
Also known as "hair metal." This well known style started with popularity of glam rock. Bands in the glam metal scene took influences from pop music, yet still remained a hard rock/heavy metal feel to it. This was the first sign of "false metal" and "posers," yet several of the bands were accepted as metal. Arguably glam metal was more of a scene, rather than a genre.
Examples: Mötely Crüe, Twisted Sister, Ratt, Warrant, WASP

Progressive Metal
Pretty much a fusion of metal and progressive rock. Or it is simply the metal counterpart of progressive rock? The term progressive means rock music with complex instrumental playing and odd time signatures. They also typically don't follow the verse-chorus theme. Prog-metal came very early, but it's still actually fairly common today.
Examples: Rush, Queensrÿche, Dream Theatre, Liquid Tension Experiment, Opeth, Meshuggah, Death, Mastodon

Power Metal
Following the style of speed metal. Power metal also incorporates lots of melody and often keyboard accompaniment. Power metal also broke the angry stereotype for metal.
Examples: Helloween, Yngwie Malmsteen, Gamma Ray, Dragonforce, X-Japan, 3 Inches of Blood



Thrash Metal
When glam-metal was becoming overly popular, a lot of bands got pissed-the-fuck-off, and made music. The result was thrash metal. If speed metal is metal on speed, then thrash metal is metal on steroids. It's heavier and angrier, then its older counterpart.
Examples: Metallica, Anthrax, Slayer, Megadeath, Sepultura, Testament, Dark Angel, Gwar

Black Metal
Metal wasn't angry enough for some Satanists, so they formed black metal. They upped the distortion, and did even tremolo-picking and double kicking on the bass drums, then which is featured in thrash. Black metal also has their songs put together in a weird way, just listen to it and you will see. Vocals are typically very high pitched and raspy yet may also be grunty and growly or even operatic. Black metal guys also wore lots of creepy make-up and black spikes and stuff, like the guys from KISS, but even scarier.
Examples: Venom, Bathory, Mayhem, Samael, Behemoth, Gorgoroth, Satyricon



Death Metal
Writing songs about death, murder, gore and even vikings. Guitars, drums and bass are heavy and usually fast as fuck but can be slower at times. This was also where we got our first good listen of the (in)famous death-growl, sounding like a combination between the Cookie Monsters, Dr. Claw from Inspector Gadget and Satan himself. Not for the timid.
Examples: Death, Cannibal Corpse, Behemoth, Debauchery, Morbid Angel

Gothenburg Metal
Later death metal bands from Gothenburg formed a popular sub-genre called "Melodic death metal" or "Gothenburg metal." Not all bands who play this style are from Gothenburg, obviously, but this is where the genre was formed. It's pretty much death metal but with melody. Some metalheads don't consider this real death metal as it does sound much different from it at times.
Examples: In Flames, Amon Amarth, Arch Enemy, Eluveitie

Doom Metal
I guess a lot of people got bored with metal being so damned fast and complex. They started longing for the old days of Black Sabbath. Doom metal emphasizes slowness and a very mournful and dark atmosphere. Doom metal can either be really sad, epic or all stoner-ish like Black Sabbath. Pretty much take a Black Sabbath song, keep the slow speed of it but make it way heavier and you got doom metal.
Examples: Candlemass, The Sword, The Melvins, Paradise Lost, My Dying Bride

Drone Metal
To be honest, I don't know much about this since I've never listened to it to much. Pretty much it's like doom metal, but even slower, notes and riffs can last for a very long time. For the fans of minimalism, or people who are really stoned.
Examples: Earth, Sun O))), The Melvins, Boris

Sludge Metal
Sludge metal emerged with grunge, I believe. Sludge metal combines the slowness of doom metal with the high speed intensity of hardcore punk. I know what you're saying "What the fuck? How the hell does that work?" Trust me it does, it results in some very trippy ass shit. You could have fast guitars and slow drums or vise versa, or maybe at one point it's all slow-as-fuck and then it'll go all crazy fast.
Examples: The Melvins, Eyehategod, Mastodon, Corrosion Of Conformity, Breaking Wheel

Gothic Metal
Combine the heaviness of metal and the darkness of doom metal and gothic rock which features a lot of dark atmospheres and spooky keyboards and shit like that. Mostly very dark sounding, but it can also sound a little pop-ish at times, but at other times it can be rather aggressive even.
Examples: Paradise Lost, Lacuna Coil, Type O Negative, Farmer Boys

Symphonic Metal
Similar to gothic metal, yet less dark and well, more symphonic. It combines other styles of metal, typically goth, power or thrash with symphonic and orchestral music. Again, it can range from poppy to aggressive.
Examples: Nightwish, Within Temptation, Apocalyptica, Hevein, X-Japan

Shred those cellos!


Folk Metal
Another interesting fusion genre. Combines heavy metal music with folk and this can be any genre of either. Traditional folk with power metal or Celtic folk with death metal. The possibilities are endless. The result can sound absolutely amazing. The bands may even have traditional folk instruments alongside the typical metal ones. Vocals can even be in the style of traditional folk music.
Examples: Skyclad, Folkearth, Eluveitie, Nightwish, Ensiferum

Groove Metal
No, this is not a hippy kind of metal, this is actually a form spun off of thrash metal. It is very brutal and aggressive, arguably more so than most thrash metal, yet it is not as fast paced, more repetitive and less technical. It focuses on groove, hence the title of the genre. It typically takes more influence from hardcore punk and gets a lot of the heaviness from it. Some metalheads don't consider it true metal, but it's generally regarded as such by the larger majority of metal heads.
Examples: Pantera, Sepultura, Soulfly, Lamb of God, Machine Head, Throwdown, White Zombie, Farmer Boys

Grindcore
Although it doesn't have "metal" in the name, grindcore is often considered part of extreme heavy metal. Grindcore bands combine death metal with industrial music, hardcore and noise rock. The result is of course very noisy to most people. This genre is often confused with death metal, though it sounds very different to the trained ear. Not all bands of this genre are considered "true metal," unless they focus on more death metal elements, as this genre does have a lot of influence outside of metal. Personally, I don't really enjoy grindcore in a musical sense, but the concept of just making the most crazy-fast and noisy kind of music (while still actually being music) does amuse me to an extent.
Examples: Napalm Death, Carcass, Anal Cunt, Extreme Noise Terror, Abnormality

WARNING: The following genres may not be considered actual metal genres by some metalheads. That is, if the only metal bands you listen to mainly fall under the genres listed below, you might be called a "poser." But there are plenty of more open-minded people out there, too.

Alternative Metal
With the rise of alternative rock, alternative metal came along with it. Some were impressive, but many were rejected as true metal. The style has a lot of unusual characteristics, such as odd time signatures, various influences outside of metal or rock music and vocal/lyric styles not typical in metal. Some alternative metal bands are closely associated with grunge music and the grunge scene.
Examples: Faith No More, System Of A Down, Disturbed, Tool, Godsmack, Alice In Chains, Soundgarden, Drowning Pool, Evanescence, In Flames

Industrial Metal
Following alternative metal and industrial music, industrial metal combines metal with industrial music. The sound is usually repetitive metal riffs, sampling of sound effects, and keyboard sounds to emulate industrial-machinery sounds.
Examples: Nine Inch Nails, White Zombie, Clawfinger, Samael, Ministry, Marilyn Manson, Static-X, Rammstein



Funk Metal
Another alt-metal spin-off. This one takes influence from funk music. Funky eh? Har-har-har. I don't listen to much of it, but it's kinda cool actually.
Examples: Faith No More, Primus, Rage Against The Machine, Incubus, Extreme

Rap Metal
A lot like funk metal, but this one takes influences from hip-hop. Guess the kind of vocal style.
Examples: Rage Against the Machine, Clawfinger, Limp Bizkit, Hollywood Undead

Metalcore
Pretty much here's how metalcore started: a bunch of emo kids got bullied in high school and as a result they got angry and started bands; it resulted in metalcore. It's heavy, yeah, but it gets its heaviness from modern hardcore and NOT metal. The vocals are typically a mixture of quazi-death growls, and soft whiny voiced singing. Metalcore also spawned deathcore, which allowed bands to sneak further into the extreme metal scene by adding more death metal influence. You can probably tell I'm not too fond of this genre for the most part, but the odd band is okay. I just find it very over-rated, considering how popular it is.
Examples: All That Remains, God Forbid, Throwdown, Killswitch Engage, Bullet For My Valentine, The Black Dahlia Murder, Avenged Sevenfold, Job For A Cowboy

Nu Metal
Combine every genre below my warning and you get this. Some of it I like, most of it I hate. The true metal heads despise this and reject it as anything metal. This style of music was very popular in the 90s and as a result it's what got a lot of people my age in to metal, when they expressed more interest. Personally, I'm both a defender and an enemy of this genre. On one hand, I praise it for introducing me into heavy metal, and on the other hand I loath it for marring its name as well. A lot of nu-metal bands do reject the title and don't even call themselves metal at all, while others pose as metal and act like they're the heaviest shit, when they are far from it. But hey, to each their own.
Examples: Korn, Disturbed, Mushroomhead, Slipknot, Mudvayne, Dope, Kitty



Anyways, that concludes my (not-so) little guide the basic metal genres. There's even more, but I don't feel like getting into them, most of them are sub-sub-genres of the ones I already mentioned. So I hope this either helped, or was at least entertaining. If you wanna point out any mistakes or disagree with anything feel free to maturely point it out in a comment or something.


 
Guest article disclaimer:
This is a guest article, which means it does not necessarily represent the point of view of the MS Staff.




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Richard - 03.05.2010 at 02:40  
An interesting read. Metal in its entirety is a much bigger subject than many people probably realise, with all the different types of bands and genres.

It's admirable that you made it clear you're a 'newbie' to Metal, and encourage readers to comment on mistakes and such. Any such article is likely to provoke disagreement and debate. On that note, I don't think Nightwish are an example of Folk Metal.
Xim - 03.05.2010 at 17:32  
True, they are more symphonic metal. But I heard their first album, which sounded more folk metal to me actually.
Ellrohir - 03.05.2010 at 20:00  
Angels Fall First being "folk"? which parts exactly?
spiritofvengence - 08.05.2010 at 02:27  
Thin Lizzy = blues, not metal at all. just because "The Boys Are Back In Town" was heavier than their other stuff doesn't make them metal. Does "Revolution" make the Beatles metal?
Black Tide = emo, doesn't even belong
Iron Maiden = pop metal (after all, they are metal that is popular both within and without the metal genre - Metallica doesn't count because no one in metal likes them anymore - trust me)

Mercyful Fate belongs w. the black metal genre, by the way
Culty - 08.05.2010 at 02:59  
"Iron Maiden = pop metal" that's cute kiddo.
Xim - 08.05.2010 at 03:16  
Spiritofvengence I disagree and I'm sure a lot of people can back me up on this.

Thin Lizzy = Although more hard rock by today's standards, they helped develop the heavy metal genre when it was starting out.

Black Tide = Clearly, you've never even bothered to listen to this band if you're calling them "emo".

Iron Maiden = Um, yeah, what Culty said

Metallica = Your comment on that is stupid. They are one of the most successful metal bands in history and it'd be stupid not to mention them. Plenty of people still like them.

Maybe Mercyful Fate could be called Black Metal, but they more so formed a proto-type for it. They sound more like traditional heavy metal/speed metal, but meh I'll give you a point for that one, but the rest you said is just wrong.
wrathchild - 08.05.2010 at 17:34  
You forgot lounge, among others...
Doc Godin - 17.05.2010 at 11:58  
Written by spiritofvengence on 08.05.2010 at 02:27

Iron Maiden = pop metal (after all, they are metal that is popular both within and without the metal genre - Metallica doesn't count because no one in metal likes them anymore - trust me)

I suspect you're just trolling, as I've just breezed through a number of your posts and there seems to be little to no thought put into them. But, I have a few minutes to spare so I guess I'll respond to some of your insightful comments before you break the thin ice you seem to be walking on in other threads.

While "pop metal" isn't an official genre or anything, I can see why it would automatically equate to anything that's popular. I suspect you either have a limited grasp on the English language or you're just a silly elitist, but I'll pretend it's the previous for the sake of this post. Generally the term "pop metal" is applied to overly accessible, catchy, simple, fluffy, sugary sounding music (like a lot of euro power metal). Secondly, as for the Metallica bit - they have 350+ votes in the Megadeth vs Metallica thread and are rated the 3rd most favourited band on this website (one of the biggest metal websites in the world). At the same time, it's fairly easy to take pot-shots and bands that sell a lot of records (such as Metallica), like I have seen you do in a number of your posts.
DayFly - 17.05.2010 at 16:18  
http://www.metalcrypt.com/genres.php

That guide is so much better written than yours. It may also be biased but at least it isn't as superficial and immature and it actually puts up an effort at describing the music. Plus the author can actually write. Alternatively, take a look at the wikipedia entry. Somehow, I also doubt you've listened to half the bands you namedropped here. An unnecessary article if there ever was one, thumbs down.
JohnDoe - 18.05.2010 at 16:59  
Written by spiritofvengence on 08.05.2010 at 02:27

Thin Lizzy = blues, not metal at all. just because "The Boys Are Back In Town" was heavier than their other stuff doesn't make them metal. Does "Revolution" make the Beatles metal?
Black Tide = emo, doesn't even belong
Iron Maiden = pop metal (after all, they are metal that is popular both within and without the metal genre - Metallica doesn't count because no one in metal likes them anymore - trust me)

Mercyful Fate belongs w. the black metal genre, by the way


Thin Lizzy is not a blues band, they have blues influences, that's true.

Iron Maiden pop? That's not even funny

Nobody likes Metallica? Well, I like them
Doc Godin - 12.07.2010 at 22:29  
Written by spiritofvengence on 08.05.2010 at 02:27

Thin Lizzy = blues, not metal at all. just because "The Boys Are Back In Town" was heavier than their other stuff doesn't make them metal. Does "Revolution" make the Beatles metal?

Name-dropping Thin Lizzy's most famous song really doesn't make your argument come across as anything but uneducated babbling. The entire Jailbreak album is damn heavy, just as heavy as Motorhead's debut, if not more so.

Written by Xim on 08.05.2010 at 03:16

Spiritofvengence I disagree and I'm sure a lot of people can back me up on this.

Thin Lizzy = Although more hard rock by today's standards, they helped develop the heavy metal genre when it was starting out.

Spiritofvengence doesn't know what he's talking about, pretty much...well, ever. Yes, Thin Lizzy is more just Hard Rock by todays standards, but so is Led Zeppelin - they were considered metal at one time.

Thin Lizzy are probably in the same realm as say...AC/DC - not entirely metal by todays measurements, but had a big influence on the genre.


...Oh woops, I forgot spiritofvengence ran away from the site because too many people disagreed with his idiotic comments.
Marcel Hubregtse - 12.07.2010 at 22:56  
Written by Doc Godin on 12.07.2010 at 22:29

Name-dropping Thin Lizzy's most famous song really doesn't make your argument come across as anything but uneducated babbling. The entire Jailbreak album is damn heavy, just as heavy as Motorhead's debut, if not more so.



And then you even forget to mention their most metal album by far, Thunder And Lightning
Doc Godin - 12.07.2010 at 23:20  
Written by Marcel Hubregtse on 12.07.2010 at 22:56

Written by Doc Godin on 12.07.2010 at 22:29

Name-dropping Thin Lizzy's most famous song really doesn't make your argument come across as anything but uneducated babbling. The entire Jailbreak album is damn heavy, just as heavy as Motorhead's debut, if not more so.



And then you even forget to mention their most metal album by far, Thunder And Lightning

Haven't heard that one yet.
Bad English - 14.10.2010 at 01:18  
OK:
Good article
HM - BLS
Speed Metal: Accept why? Where is Blind Guardian 1th two, X Wild, Early Rage and Avanger
PM: 3 Inches Of Blood dont fits in PM band luist what you gave
I even wont discuss about doom, wortshless :no hopes:
Symphonic Metal: X Japan
Xim - 14.10.2010 at 03:00  
I could probably write a better article now, but I'll probably say the same thing in another year or something. Plus it'd kinda ruin the point, since it's supposed to be a newbie's thoughts I guess. Maybe I'll write another one some time down the road though.

Yeah, BLS is probably more sludge or something, and 3 Inches of Blood isn't really straightforward power metal, more like classic metal mixed with modern metal. I didn't hear Rage until after I wrote the article. But yeah they totally deserve a mention for sure, I agree! Awesome band.
Defiler82 - 16.10.2010 at 18:50  
The main problem with the article is that it's too subjective. You can barely draw the line between Speed Metal, Heavy Metal, or Speed Metal and Power Metal, or Gothic and Doom / Doom and Sludge - too much of those genres blend together when it comes to field-testing it. Crowbar are doom/sludge, so where does it leaves Down's music - for example. Does Angel Witch belongs to NWOBHM (hence heavy metal?) Maybe NWOBHM should be put as a different style from Heavy metal - and leaving that like that - meaning there's no REAL "Heavy Metal" genre - it's the big umbrella above all of the styles - but every band can be subjected to other sub-genre.

But when it comes to differ between Job For A Cowboy (shitty band IMO) and Avenged Sevenfold (another shitty band IMO) - which are COMPLETELY different by all means (like Guns & Roses are different from Cryptopsy) - they fall under the same sub-genre with little words of "yeah - and then you got deathcore which is a heavier version of metalcore". You can barely put the difference between Power and Speed but you say those two bands in the same breathe ? It's not that they worth their own style but this article is too subjective and too biased in favour of classic (and BETTER in my taste) metal genres.

Needs some re-writing. Overall it's nice and clearify many of what people think of metal when they first encounter it. But it is not educational enough to really stab a good definitions. Imagine me listens to Morbid Angel's "Where The Slime Lives" and then saying "Yeah - it has slow riffs, gloomy atmospere, pissed off singing which are not exactly classic death metal growls - this band is probably SLUDGE"...

IMO - Today's bands can barely fit to one metal genre, and when they do - it's cliches (Even though some cliches bands are awesome). Think of Mastodon. They blend Stoner Rock, Sludge Metal, Alternative Metal, Progressive Metal, and yet the fit none of the above. Now try Meshuggah. Technical Groove Math Metal ? Isn't that too long ? Cuz they ain't no Queensryche to fit exactly to the progressive sub-type. Even bansd like Amorphis doesn't fit to Folk-metal, neither does Melechesh or Nile. And is Blind Guardian a power metal band ? Even now when they gone all symphonic ? but what about they early almost thrash metal career ? Nevermore are progressive metal ? Cuz they sound like Candlemass on Speed to me. Are they Doom Groove Power Metal ? It goes on forever.

I think the whole metal definitions are long dead and gone.
Let us simplify things.
- Traditional Metal
- Extreme Metal
- Modern Metal
that is it. You can put all metal bands to one specific category and they'll fit there perfectly, still giving enough room to breathe for every sub-genre. Traditional can go from Thin Lizzy to Megadeth. Extreme can go from Mayhem to Suicide Silence to Kreator, and Modern can fit every band that doesn't sound like something that's been done till the mid-90's, be it Korn, Lamb Of God or Textures.
And there you have it.
Xim - 17.10.2010 at 00:58  
Thanks for all the input Defiler! But yeah I'll keep all that stuff in mind if I write another article. I don't think I'll narrow it down to three categories though, but I might keep the trad/extreme/new metal style in mind.
Marcel Hubregtse - 19.10.2010 at 12:52  
Written by Bad English on 14.10.2010 at 01:18


HM - BLS



Yes Black Label Society are pure heavy metal. What else would you call it?
JCJen7 - 08.05.2011 at 08:14  
Written by Defiler82 on 16.10.2010 at 18:50

The main problem with the article is that it's too subjective. You can barely draw the line between Speed Metal, Heavy Metal, or Speed Metal and Power Metal, or Gothic and Doom / Doom and Sludge - too much of those genres blend together when it comes to field-testing it. Crowbar are doom/sludge, so where does it leaves Down's music - for example. Does Angel Witch belongs to NWOBHM (hence heavy metal?) Maybe NWOBHM should be put as a different style from Heavy metal - and leaving that like that - meaning there's no REAL "Heavy Metal" genre - it's the big umbrella above all of the styles - but every band can be subjected to other sub-genre.

But when it comes to differ between Job For A Cowboy (shitty band IMO) and Avenged Sevenfold (another shitty band IMO) - which are COMPLETELY different by all means (like Guns & Roses are different from Cryptopsy) - they fall under the same sub-genre with little words of "yeah - and then you got deathcore which is a heavier version of metalcore". You can barely put the difference between Power and Speed but you say those two bands in the same breathe ? It's not that they worth their own style but this article is too subjective and too biased in favour of classic (and BETTER in my taste) metal genres.

Needs some re-writing. Overall it's nice and clearify many of what people think of metal when they first encounter it. But it is not educational enough to really stab a good definitions. Imagine me listens to Morbid Angel's "Where The Slime Lives" and then saying "Yeah - it has slow riffs, gloomy atmospere, pissed off singing which are not exactly classic death metal growls - this band is probably SLUDGE"...

IMO - Today's bands can barely fit to one metal genre, and when they do - it's cliches (Even though some cliches bands are awesome). Think of Mastodon. They blend Stoner Rock, Sludge Metal, Alternative Metal, Progressive Metal, and yet the fit none of the above. Now try Meshuggah. Technical Groove Math Metal ? Isn't that too long ? Cuz they ain't no Queensryche to fit exactly to the progressive sub-type. Even bansd like Amorphis doesn't fit to Folk-metal, neither does Melechesh or Nile. And is Blind Guardian a power metal band ? Even now when they gone all symphonic ? but what about they early almost thrash metal career ? Nevermore are progressive metal ? Cuz they sound like Candlemass on Speed to me. Are they Doom Groove Power Metal ? It goes on forever.

I think the whole metal definitions are long dead and gone.
Let us simplify things.
- Traditional Metal
- Extreme Metal
- Modern Metal
that is it. You can put all metal bands to one specific category and they'll fit there perfectly, still giving enough room to breathe for every sub-genre. Traditional can go from Thin Lizzy to Megadeth. Extreme can go from Mayhem to Suicide Silence to Kreator, and Modern can fit every band that doesn't sound like something that's been done till the mid-90's, be it Korn, Lamb Of God or Textures.
And there you have it.


I think the point of genres are to define the music more than that though. I mean, why stop at 3? Why not just call it all metal? Why even classify it as metal? It's all just rock right? It could go on and on. It is all music. How far someone wants to distinguish them is their decision. I personally prefer having the genres. If someone likes thrash metal, and wants to communicate that they want to know more thrash bands, "traditional metal" would hardly work.

A: "Hey, I really like Megadeth, what other traditional metal bands are there?"
B: "How about Black Sabbath?"

And what about a band like Striker. They play 100% speed metal, yet their debut was last year. They are modern, but also fall under the exact same sound as other speed metal bands. So, if you classify them as modern, because, well they are, then you would be putting them into a category with Korn. But, if you put them in traditional metal it would seem to suggest that they are NOT modern, because there is a modern category right there, but Striker isn't in it. So, the obvious choice would be to put them in traditional modern metal, but now that just ruined the whole point of putting them in your (possibly overly) simplistic umbrellas.

Another flaw would be the exhaggerated boundaries it would make. Say for example Anthrax Kreator. Anthrax would obviously be traditional metal by your standards, yet Kreator would most likely be extreme metal. However, you and I both know that Anthrax is closer to Kreator than say Anthrax is to Blue Cheer, or Kreator is to Mayhem. People would begin to think of Kreator as no where near the same scene as Anthrax, when in fact, they were both huge parts in the international thrash metal scene.

I quite like the article, and the genres that were used.
M C Vice - 18.07.2011 at 14:09  
Written by JCJen7 on 08.05.2011 at 08:14

Why even classify it as metal? It's all just rock right?

Actualy, metal ,originaly, is a separate genre of music from rock. The early metal bands like Black Sabbath and Deep Purple were blues bands that just made their sound heavier. So, technicly, early metal was just heavy blues (listen to the debut albums from Black Sabbath and Motorhead, as well as Sad Wings Of Destiny by Judas Priest). Metal started to cross over with rock in the 80s, primerily through the new wave of british heavy metal, which mixed the original heavy metal sound with elements from punk rock. So while there is a large amount of blurring between the 2 genres (with many bands falling into both catagories), metal and rock are seperate derivatives of blues music.
JCJen7 - 19.07.2011 at 03:16  
Written by M C Vice on 18.07.2011 at 14:09

Written by JCJen7 on 08.05.2011 at 08:14

Why even classify it as metal? It's all just rock right?

Actualy, metal ,originaly, is a separate genre of music from rock. The early metal bands like Black Sabbath and Deep Purple were blues bands that just made their sound heavier. So, technicly, early metal was just heavy blues (listen to the debut albums from Black Sabbath and Motorhead, as well as Sad Wings Of Destiny by Judas Priest). Metal started to cross over with rock in the 80s, primerily through the new wave of british heavy metal, which mixed the original heavy metal sound with elements from punk rock. So while there is a large amount of blurring between the 2 genres (with many bands falling into both catagories), metal and rock are seperate derivatives of blues music.


I'm not positive where this all fits in, but yes certainly early heavy metal was very bluesy. However I think its a stretch to say that "So, technicly, early metal was just heavy blues ". I mean, yeah, Zeppelin, Sabbath, early Priest, AC/DC, Thin Lizzy, and Deep Purple were all somewhat bluesy in the early 70's, their music was far from blues. However, I think the ties are much closer to the classic rock bands (The Who, Rolling Stones, Beatles [also all very bluesy]), and psychedelic rock bands such as Jimi Hendrix, Blue Cheery, and Iron Butterfly. All these "rock" bands I mentioned in my opinion are much more closely related to the early metal bands than a straight blues band, even if the Rolling Stones (for example) were very bluesy.
Cuca Beludo - 19.07.2011 at 05:31  
Black metal wasn't founded by satanists. Black metal was (basically) founded by Thomas "Quorthon" Forsberg, the mastermind of Bathory. Quorthon was fan of Black Sabbath and Motörhead, when he met Fredrick "Freddan" "Hanoi" and Jonas "Vans McBurger" Åkerlund, and formed the band. Quorthon was influenced too by some punk rock bands, and that's what you see in the early Bathory Albuns: Speedy songs, with heavy guitars and these "dark" themes. Quorthon was addicted in occultism, satanism and things like this, so he we have those lyrical themes, because i think Black Sabbath alone doesn't make it all.
And this shriek voice of Quorthon contributed to form the black metal we see today. I am not fan of Black Metal, although I am a huge fan of Bathory. Anything that don't is related to Bathory that influenced Black metal I don't know, but i know that Venom was another huge band for forming Black Metal, especially the album "Black metal"... that... was... kinda of the base for this name
M C Vice - 20.07.2011 at 09:52  
Written by JCJen7 on 19.07.2011 at 03:16

Written by M C Vice on 18.07.2011 at 14:09

Written by JCJen7 on 08.05.2011 at 08:14

Why even classify it as metal? It's all just rock right?

Actualy, metal ,originaly, is a separate genre of music from rock. The early metal bands like Black Sabbath and Deep Purple were blues bands that just made their sound heavier. So, technicly, early metal was just heavy blues (listen to the debut albums from Black Sabbath and Motorhead, as well as Sad Wings Of Destiny by Judas Priest). Metal started to cross over with rock in the 80s, primerily through the new wave of british heavy metal, which mixed the original heavy metal sound with elements from punk rock. So while there is a large amount of blurring between the 2 genres (with many bands falling into both catagories), metal and rock are seperate derivatives of blues music.


I'm not positive where this all fits in, but yes certainly early heavy metal was very bluesy. However I think its a stretch to say that "So, technicly, early metal was just heavy blues ". I mean, yeah, Zeppelin, Sabbath, early Priest, AC/DC, Thin Lizzy, and Deep Purple were all somewhat bluesy in the early 70's, their music was far from blues. However, I think the ties are much closer to the classic rock bands (The Who, Rolling Stones, Beatles [also all very bluesy]), and psychedelic rock bands such as Jimi Hendrix, Blue Cheery, and Iron Butterfly. All these "rock" bands I mentioned in my opinion are much more closely related to the early metal bands than a straight blues band, even if the Rolling Stones (for example) were very bluesy.

Agree to disagree?
JCJen7 - 17.09.2011 at 08:24  
Written by DayFly on 17.05.2010 at 16:18

http://www.metalcrypt.com/genres.php

That guide is so much better written than yours. It may also be biased but at least it isn't as superficial and immature and it actually puts up an effort at describing the music. Plus the author can actually write. Alternatively, take a look at the wikipedia entry. Somehow, I also doubt you've listened to half the bands you namedropped here. An unnecessary article if there ever was one, thumbs down.


I only read the first 2 genres the guy you linked wrote, but I am alread unhappy with it. They say that Judas Priest are a part of the NWOBHM, and that thrash declined in popularity in the late 80's. I do not agree.

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