Bands
Cryptic Warning

The band was formed in the summer of 2000 in Boston, MA under the name Cryptic Warning. It is an old-school thrash metal band with a love for brutal, technical death metal.

2005 marked the release of Cryptic Warning's debut full-length CD Sanity's Aberration. Combining shredding solos, lightning-fast riffs and unrelenting intensity, Sanity's Aberration is the best representation of what Cryptic Warning was all about.

In June of 2006, the band decided to change it's name from Cryptic Warning to Revocation. During an interview with Davidson, when asked about the name change, he commented: "I think, looking a little deeper into it, we made a lot of mistakes with Cryptic Warning. We were younger and didn't really know what we were doing, so Revocation was us starting fresh with a clean slate and revoking our past mistakes."

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Posted: 08.08.2016 by Bad English

Bands
The Steve Grimmett Band

Steve Grimmett has a history that is nothing short of incredible, having what is widely regarded as one of the most powerful and original voices in rock and metal. As vocalist with the legendary Grim Reaper, Steve accomplished major success during the '80s with three highly acclaimed studio albums, along with single releases, MTV airplay, and extensive touring in the United States. Grim Reaper videos can often still be seen on some of the major music channels. Afterwords, Steve spent a brief period with Onslaught and again enjoyed commercial success, including a single that charted in the UK. More recently Steve's success came in the form of Lionsheart, a powerful melodic metal band whose debut album reached number one in the mainstream Japanese charts.

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Posted: 07.08.2016 by Bad English

Bands
Steve Grimmett's Grim Reaper

Led by the inspired guitar work of Nick Bowcott and the powerful lungs of Steve Grimmett, Grim Reaper's tough, raw, but melodically charged music embodied British heavy metal's most popular devices (and clichés) throughout the mid-'80s. The fact that Grim Reaper was capable of combining the above attributes so competently, yet truly excelled at none of them resulted in an exceedingly swift "rags to glory and back to rags" story, which somehow was as surprising as it was strangely fitting. Add to this a far from attractive visual aesthetic (i.e., they were four crusty English dudes with handlebar moustaches, bad hair, and even worse teeth) and it was clear Grim Reaper was doomed to enjoy a limited afterlife in the newly established MTV regime.

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Posted: 07.08.2016 by Bad English

Bands
Wretch

The Gates of Slumber was a Doom metal outfit from Indianapolis which achieved it's legendary status through working hard and passionately. It started as Karl Simon's project somewhere about 1998, but the demo 'Sabbath Witch' was already recorded with a first full lineup, though not released until 2002. The Gates of Slumber lineup had several changes in the beginning; in spite of this, Karl always continued his work as the band's mastermind. Bass guitarist Jason McCash and drummer Iron Bob Fouts came to be integral parts of this, enhancing The Gates of Slumber with their skills and experience.

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Posted: 03.08.2016 by Bad English

Bands
Philadelphia

A little over 30 years ago, in the Deep South of north Louisiana, there was a Christian street outreach group called Philadelphia (named after the faithful church in Revelations). It also included a band since some of the key members grew up playing rock 'n roll. The band took the same name, and began to play gigs all over the ArkLaTex region.

Crowds were small at first but enthusiastic. After a few lineup changes, Philly settled into a hard rocking trio, with Brian Clark on bass & vocals, drummer Brian Martini and guitarist Phil Scholling. Some people, especially some established church folk, thought the band rocked way too hard to be playing essentially Christian music. They thought rock was the devil's music, and couldn't be 'redeemed'. The boys in the band disagreed, and since they were playing nearly exclusively to younger crowds, it was a familiar language to both. Philly found no music in and of itself evil, simply the intent of it; and using rock as a tool to communicate....communicate they did!

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Posted: 27.07.2016 by Bad English

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