Interviews
Skyforger

Bad English: This may be a weird question, but how do you envision the Latvian metal scene if bands such as Skyforger and Heaven Grey had never existed?

Peter Kvetkovskis: Well, there was always and still is another bands around - the metal scene here is quite big enough even without Skyforger or Heaven Grey. The question is how unique and original those bands are, but that's another topic to talk about I guess. It is very hard to make your name worldwide if you are from such a small far away country like Latvia is. You must be somehow original to stand out from millions of bands playing all around the world. Also you must be in right time and right and luckily for us we were. I could guess that many people here, who maybe tried to play something in a vein we do, just gave up only because they don't wanted to be called copy of Skyforger - who knows, but I think we have enough of good bands here to keep metal scene going and new promising bands have been seen lately.

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Posted: 22.07.2016 by Bad English | Comments (3)

Interviews
Civil War

Bad English: Hi. Thank you for doing this interview with us at Metal Storm.

NPJ: No problems!!

Bad English: Can you introduce yourself, and tell us how you decided to become a singer and how you started listening to metal?

NPJ: Oh, well things just happened. I've always had the music inside me and when the NWOBHM came: I found my destiny. What can I say? Metal is my life!

Bad English: You're from Borlänge, right? And you support Leksands IF?

NPJ: Yes, I am from Kvarnsveden, Borlänge Kommun and of course I support Leksand. There is no alternative. Well, now Borlänge Hockey is on their way to the second division, Allsvenskan, so of course I support them as well.

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Posted: 18.07.2016 by Bad English | Comments (4)

Interviews
Pantheist

Bad English: Hi. Thank you for doing this interview with us at Metal Storm.

Kostas Panagiotou: It's a pleasure as Metal Storm is one of my favourite metal sites on the net!

Bad English: Can you introduce yourself, and tell us about your first steps into music, both as a listener and as a musician?

KP: I grew up in Greece and you are immediately exposed to a lot of music in this country. Greeks like to party, and as they are emotional people they also like to express their emotions through listening to their favourite songs, so music is everywhere. I only started to think of myself as a composer when I had moved to Belgium. Around the age of 13 I started composing music in my head, even though in retrospect it just turned out to be variations of existing songs. But I didn't start playing music myself until I was 15 and bought my first keyboard. At the time I listened mainly to classical music, electronic music like Jarre and Vangelis and Greek rebetico (music from the Greek underworld). Later I also got into rock music through the likes of Deep Purple, Uriah Heep and Black Sabbath. Actually my first bands were playing covers of popular Greek music and rebetico, I only started to listen to doom metal and the like when a friend introduced me to these styles at the University, and Pantheist was only founded after I had completed my studies.

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Posted: 14.07.2016 by Bad English | Comments (1)

Interviews
Wyrd

Bad English: Hello. Thank you for doing this interview with us at Metal Storm.

Tell us a bit about yourself - your first steps into the music world, how you discovered metal, and how you became a musician yourself.

Tomi Kalliola: It all started with bands like Mötley Crüe, W.A.S.P. and Iron Maiden in the eighties, my older cousin listened to metal and played in bands, so I got introduced to metal at a very young age. You could say that I never had any other options but to start playing metal.

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Posted: 11.07.2016 by Bad English | Comments (2)

Interviews
Officium Triste

Bad English: Hi. Thank you for doing this interview with us here at Metal Storm.

Pim: You're welcome!

Bad English: Can you introduce yourself, and tell us how you started singing and developed your interest in metal music?

Pim: I'm Pim Blankenstein. Vocalist of Officium Triste (and a few other bands like Extreme Cold Winter, Dark Epoch and The 11th Hour). Let's start with my interest in metal. That was mainly because my older brother had some KISS records in his collection that appealed to me. Later on I heard more bands, mainly on compilation tapes my brother got from a friend. I pretty much liked what I heard from bands like MSG, UFO, Saxon, Motörhead, and Thin Lizzy to name a few. A bit later in the early '80s I also developed a liking for a lot of alternative guitar rock bands like U2, The Alarm, The Cult, Big Country and so on. At school there were some metalheads who copied me tapes of bands like Dio, Iron Maiden, Accept, Raven, Metallica and that pretty much sparked my interest in metal, although to this day I still listen to other styles of music as well.

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Posted: 08.07.2016 by Bad English | Comments (15)

Interviews
Ordog

Bad English: Hi, Ordog. Thank you for doing this interview.

Let's start with the usual: please introduce yourself as a person and as a musician. How did you start to listen to metal, play an instrument, and come up with the idea for Ordog?

Valtteri Isometsä: I'm the guitarist and occasional drummer of the band. I also used to play bass before we got a permanent bass player. I started listening to metal because of my father. He's also into metal and rock music. When I was a kid I listened to his records because there wasn't anything else to listen. Slayer, Iron Maiden, Venom, Motörhead, Ted Nugent and stuff like that. First record I bought myself was Motörhead's No Sleep 'Til Hammersmith. And my father also plays guitar so we had a few in the house so it was easy to start playing myself.

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Posted: 05.07.2016 by Bad English | Comments (1)

Interviews
Blind Guardian

Exploring parts of the United Kingdom Blind Guardian have not visited before, I thought it would be nice to have a chat with Marcus and Frederik and see how things are thirty years on.

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Posted: 25.05.2016 by Baz Anderson | Comments (5)