Rating:
7.0
Tenochtitlan - Sotvorenie Mira
23 July 2012


01. Tlaltekutli
02. Nachalo
03. Sokol I Zmey
04. Nual
05. Pokhorony Montesumy
06. Tsvetok Ishchel


What we have here is doom which draws its influences from south of the (well, my) border… Fortunately that influence comes by way of the Aztec, Mayan, and Inca civilizations as opposed to, say, a Tejano or Mariachi doom infusion.

My Dying Bride meets Selena it is not.

Ok, so let's start with the band. It's a "virtual" collaborative side project for a bunch of Russians involved in other bands. They take the death doom approach that so many bands out of Russia have taken and do what a variety of other metal bands have done - pick an ancient civilization with obscure instruments and pour it on like red sauce on an enchilada.

Metalheads seem to eat this stuff up. Metalheads also have a hard on for creating new sub-genres. Death doom can be terrifying. The Aztecs used to rip muthatruckas hearts out… this shit should be powerful enough to send your annoying little sister screaming from the house, no?

No.

For a beginning, the doom falls a bit flat. I used "beginning" intentionally, as it is the second track on this album, as well as the name of a 2010 release by Septic Mind. That album was the stuff of nightmares. By comparison Sotvorenie Mira isn't even the "show up to school naked" scenario. It's not poorly done by any stretch, just lacking in both sonic and emotional impact, and tedious at times, particularly the chanting segment on "Сокол и Змей" which seems to go on and on and on and on.

And that infusion of "cultural" music doesn't particularly help. Sure, it gives it a Amazonian jungle feel, but it's neither well infused nor creepy. It is about as ominous as a Peruvian Pan Flute band, and functions more like sides, sauce, and garnish rather than part of the main course itself.

Tenochtitlan deserve credit for an intriguing - if not overly far reaching - concept. Unfortunately the doom foundation was short in impact and the added elements further exacerbate the shortage of "oomph." (doomph?)

Performance: 7
Songwriting: 7
Originality: 8
Production: 7


Website: http://www.realmusic.ru/tenoch


 



Written on 02.10.2012 by
BitterCOld
BitterCOld has been officially reviewing albums for MetalStorm since 2009.
More reviews by BitterCOld ››



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Evil Chip - 03.10.2012 at 02:51  
Sounds really bizarre and kitsch.
NocturnalStalker - 05.10.2012 at 20:11  
I agree with a review for the biggest part. It doesn't stop me from loving this band, though.
It's just that I see Tenochtitlan as ethnic metal band with some doom metal influences and not vice versa... Kind of like a heavier variant of Senmuth's solo albums.
Iriki - 14.10.2012 at 04:33  
I've ever heard about this band before, but it really intrigues me how can they claim their aztec thematic.
I mean, how can they bring their musical notation? Is there such historical pieces enough recovered to make a viable study of this specific trace of culture of this civilization?
Marcel Hubregtse - 14.10.2012 at 11:54  
Written by Iriki on 14.10.2012 at 04:33

I've ever heard about this band before, but it really intrigues me how can they claim their aztec thematic.
I mean, how can they bring their musical notation? Is there such historical pieces enough recovered to make a viable study of this specific trace of culture of this civilization?



That would apply to viking metal as well

Btw, not that I am disagreeing with you. I agree fully.
Iriki - 14.10.2012 at 16:56  
Written by Marcel Hubregtse on 14.10.2012 at 11:54

Written by Iriki on 14.10.2012 at 04:33

I've ever heard about this band before, but it really intrigues me how can they claim their aztec thematic.
I mean, how can they bring their musical notation? Is there such historical pieces enough recovered to make a viable study of this specific trace of culture of this civilization?



That would apply to viking metal as well

Btw, not that I am disagreeing with you. I agree fully.

Yes, but there even are viking metal bands that have some accuracy.

Týr, i.e., states the viking culture in Faroe Island were better conserved and their music was restricted to chanting, and it reflects in the band's sonority.

But yes, most of them are just a big speculation
R'Vannith - 14.10.2012 at 17:40  
I guess for the most part it would depend upon how much of the traditional/folk music of a particular culture survives in some form today. Though it would be difficult to differentiate more modern transformations from much older forms.

As with the example of Tyr there, some cultures can claim to have a more "conserved" form of their traditional music which is easier to grab a hold on and mix into some metal music.

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